Home »

Avenue q

The meaning of «avenue q»

Avenue Q is a musical comedy featuring puppets and human actors with music and lyrics by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx and book by Jeff Whitty. The show won Best Musical, Book, and Score at the 2004 Tony Awards. The show was directed by Jason Moore with scenic design by Anna Louizos.[1] The puppets were designed and built by original cast member Rick Lyon.[2] Avenue Q has received many favorable reviews for its approach on themes like racism, homosexuality, and Internet pornography.

The show first opened in 2003 at the Vineyard Theatre co-produced by the Vineyard Theatre and The New Group. In July of that same year Broadway producers Kevin McCollum, Robyn Goodman, and Jeffrey Seller[3] moved the show to the John Golden Theatre on Broadway, where it ran until 2009, playing for over 2,500 performances.[4] It then transferred to the off-Broadway New World Stages, where it played until 2019. International tours have been conducted in Germany, England, and Hong Kong.[5] A school-friendly script has been produced.[6]

The principal cast includes four puppeteers and three human actors. The puppets, Princeton, Kate, Nicky, and others, are played by unconcealed puppeteers alongside costumed human actors. The show's format is a parody of PBS Kids' Sesame Street.

Avenue Q's cast consists of three human characters and eleven puppet characters who interact as if human, Sesame Street-style. The puppets are animated and voiced by puppeteers who are on stage, unconcealed. The puppet and human characters ignore the puppeteers, creating the illusion that the puppets are alive. To assist with the illusion, the puppeteers wear plain gray clothing in contrast to the human characters' colorful costumes. The same puppet may be operated by different puppeteers in different scenes, and the actor voicing the puppet may not be the one animating it. One puppeteer sometimes voices two or more puppets simultaneously. Conversely, the so-called "live-hands" puppets (see Puppets) require two puppeteers – again, in full view of the audience.

The show draws inspiration from and imitates the format of children's educational television shows Sesame Street and The Muppets. Marx interned at the program early in his career, and all four of the original cast's principal puppeteers—John Tartaglia, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Jennifer Barnhart and Rick Lyon—were Sesame Street performers (D'Abruzzo returned to Sesame Street after leaving Avenue Q[7]). Three of the puppet characters are direct recognizable parodies of Sesame Street puppets: Roommates Rod and Nicky are a riff on Bert and Ernie,[8] while Trekkie Monster bears the distinctive voice and disposition of Cookie Monster, though not his obsession with baked goods. (The production officially disclaims any connection with either Sesame Workshop or The Jim Henson Company.)[9]

All of the characters (puppet and human) are young adults who face real-world problems with uncertain solutions, as opposed to the simplistic problems and invariably happy resolutions encountered by characters on children's television programming. Much of the show's ironic humor emerges from its contrasts with Sesame Street, including the differences between innocent childhood experiences and complex adulthood. The storyline presupposes the existence of "monsters" and talking animals, and human actors sing, dance and interact with puppets, both human and non-human, as if they were sentient beings, in a light-hearted, quasi-fantasy environment. However, the characters use a considerable amount of profanity, and puppet nudity and sex are portrayed. The show addresses adult themes, such as racism, pornography, homosexuality and schadenfreude.

Related Searches

List of lettered Brooklyn avenuesAvenue 5Avenue of the Saints
Avenue TheaterAvenue of the GiantsAvenue (group)
Avenue H stationAvenue of Stars, Hong KongAvenue Range Station massacre
© 2015-2020, Wikiwordbook.info
Copying information without reference to the source is prohibited!
contact us mobile version