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Avtovaz vehicles in international markets

The meaning of «avtovaz vehicles in international markets»

Exports of AvtoVAZ vehicles to the West began in 1974; Ladas were sold as in several Western nations during the 1970s and 1980s, including Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, though trade sanctions banned their export to the United States. Under the original agreement with Fiat, the car could not be sold in competition with the 124 until its replacement (the Fiat 131 Mirafiori) had been released and all Fiat production of the 124 had ceased.

Lada cars became popular in Russia and Eastern Europe during the 1970s and 1980s, particularly in former Eastern bloc countries. Lada made its name in Western Europe selling large volumes of the VAZ-2101 and its many derivatives as an economy car during the 1980s. The common Lada sedan and estate, sometimes known as the "Classic" in the West, was based on the 1966 Fiat 124 sedan (VAZ 2104/2105/2107 vehicles were known as Signet in Canada, Riva in the UK, and Nova in Germany).

Exported worldwide in the 1980s and 1990s, Lada was a big foreign currency earner for the hard-pressed Soviet Union and was used in barter arrangements in some countries. For example, Coca-Cola traded its drinks in exchange for Lada cars which were then shipped to the United Kingdom and sold.[1] Over 60% of production was exported, mainly to Western countries (the US was the only large market not to have imported Ladas).[2]

Economic instability in the former Soviet Union in the 1990s, tightening emissions and safety legislation meant that AvtoVAZ withdrew from most Western markets by the late 1997. In later years, Lada is again exported. The Lada is marketed in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Armenia and Azerbaijan, and within the European Union, it has been made available in the Czech Republic, Romania , Slovakia, Austria, France, Germany, Hungary, and Egypt.[3]

Ladas arrived in Brazil in 1990, when Brazilian president Fernando Collor lifted the ban on car imports. Lada was the first car maker to enter the Brazilian car market as an official importer, grey importers having already brought in other brands soon after the importation re-opening. Initially, the Lada 2105 (sedan) and 2104 (station wagon) models (badged as the "Lada Laika") and the "Lada Niva" were successful, mostly among taxi drivers, because of their low prices and functionality. Between 1990 and 1992, Lada sold more cars than any other importer to Brazil. Following their arrival, Lada cars were regarded by consumers and local specialized media, as outdated and inefficient but their commercial success was due to the Lada's publicity campaign which gave their cars an image of imported vehicle affordable for almost everyone, combined with consumer curiosity for imported products, a novelty at the time.

Shortly thereafter the Samara was introduced, but did not enjoy the same success. The Laika model's popularity began to wane after a few years. However, the Niva continued to be strong in the off-road market, even having a limited edition exclusively for Brazil (Niva Pantanal). It continued to be sold until 1997. Many of the last Lada Nivas sold in Brazil had diesel engines. Most of the Nivas sold in Brazil remain operational and used cars command high prices. A 1991 Niva in very good condition can cost as much as R$11,000 or US$5,500, far more than the average price for a car of that year. The normal price for a Lada Niva made in year 1991 or 1992 is around R$6,000 or US$3,000 on the Brazilian used car market. As many as 30,000 Lada cars were sold in Brazil between 1990 and 1997.

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