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Bnc connector

The meaning of «bnc connector»

The BNC connector (initialism of "Bayonet Neill–Concelman") is a miniature quick connect/disconnect radio frequency connector used for coaxial cable.

The interface specifications for the BNC and many other connectors are referenced in MIL-STD-348.[1] It features two bayonet lugs on the female connector; mating is fully achieved with a quarter turn of the coupling nut. BNC connectors are used with miniature-to-subminiature coaxial cable in radio, television, and other radio-frequency electronic equipment, test instruments, and video signals. The BNC was commonly used for early computer networks, including ARCnet, the IBM PC Network, and the 10BASE2 variant of Ethernet. BNC connectors are made to match the characteristic impedance of cable at either 50 ohms or 75 ohms (with other impedances such as 93 ohms for ARCNET available though less common). They are usually applied for frequencies below 4 GHz[2] and voltages below 500 volts.[3]

The BNC was originally designed for military use and has gained wide acceptance in video and RF applications to 2 GHz. The BNC uses an outer conductor with slots and some plastic dielectric on each gender connector. This dielectric causes increasing losses at higher frequencies. Above 4 GHz, the slots may radiate signals, so the connector is usable, but not necessarily stable up to about 11 GHz. Both 50 ohm and 75 ohm versions are available. The BNC connector is used for signal connections such as:

The BNC connector is used for composite video on commercial video devices. Consumer electronics devices with RCA connector jacks can be used with BNC-only commercial video equipment by inserting an adapter. BNC connectors were commonly used on 10base2 thin Ethernet network cables and network cards. BNC connections can also be found in recording studios. Digital recording equipment uses the connection for synchronization of various components via the transmission of word clock timing signals.

Typically the male connector is fitted to a cable, and the female to a panel on equipment. Cable connectors are often designed to be fitted by crimping[4][dead link] using a special power or manual tool.[5][failed verification] Wire strippers which strip outer jacket, shield braid, and inner dielectric to the correct lengths in one operation are used.[6]

The connector was named the BNC (for Bayonet Neill–Concelman) after its bayonet mount locking mechanism and its inventors, Paul Neill and Carl Concelman.[2] Neill worked at Bell Labs and also invented the N connector; Concelman worked at Amphenol and also invented the C connector.

The basis for the development of the BNC connector was largely the work of Octavio M. Salati, a graduate of the Moore School of Electrical Engineering of the University of Pennsylvania.[citation needed] In 1945, while working at Hazeltine Electronics Corporation, he filed a patent for a connector for coaxial cables that would minimize wave reflection/loss. The patent was granted in 1951.[7]

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