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Citi field

The meaning of «citi field»

Citi Field is a baseball park located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in New York City. Completed in 2009, it is the home field of the New York Mets of the National League East division of Major League Baseball. The stadium was built as a replacement for the adjacent Shea Stadium, which opened in 1964.

Citi Field was designed by Populous (then HOK Sport), and is named after Citigroup, a New York financial services company that purchased the naming rights. The $850 million baseball park was funded with $615 million in public subsidies,[9] including the sale of New York City municipal bonds that are to be repaid by the Mets plus interest. The payments will offset property taxes for the lifetime of the park.[10][11] The Mets are receiving $20 million annually from Citibank in exchange for naming the stadium Citi Field.

The first game at Citi Field was on March 29, 2009, with a college baseball game between St. John's and Georgetown.[12] The Mets played their first two games at the ballpark on April 3 and 4, 2009 against the Boston Red Sox[13] as charity exhibition games. The first regular season home game was played on April 13, 2009, against the San Diego Padres. Citi Field hosted the 2013 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, marking the second time the Mets have hosted the event (the first being in 1964, the inaugural season of Shea Stadium).[14]

Since the 1990s, the Mets were looking to replace Shea Stadium. It had originally been built as a multi-purpose stadium in 1964. While it had been retrofitted as a baseball-only stadium after the NFL's New York Jets left for Giants Stadium after the 1983 season, it was still not optimal for baseball, with seating located farther away from the playing field compared to other major league ballparks.[15] The team unveiled a preliminary model of the ballpark in 1998; it featured a retractable roof and a movable grass field, which would have allowed it to host events including conventions and college basketball. The Mets also considered moving to Mitchel Field or Belmont Park in Nassau County, Long Island; Sunnyside Yard in Queens, or the West Side Yard in Manhattan.[16]

In December 2001, shortly before leaving office, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani announced "tentative agreements" for both the Mets and the New York Yankees to build new stadiums. Of the $1.6 billion sought for the stadiums, city and state taxpayers would pick up half the tab for construction, $800 million, along with $390 million on extra transportation.[17] The plan also said that the teams would be allowed to keep all parking revenues, which state officials had already said they wanted to keep to compensate the state for building new garages for the teams.[18] The teams would keep 96% of ticket revenues and 100% of all other revenues, not pay sales tax or property tax on the stadium, and would get low-cost electricity from New York state.[18] Business officials criticized the plan as giving too much money to successful teams with little reason to move to a different city.[18]

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